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    books that have had a huge impact on you

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    Karl
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    books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  Karl on Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:51 pm

    Henry Miller comes to mind because Jeff is reading him.

    Tropic of Cancer
    Tropic of Capricorn

    both super awesome.

    I started reading Black Spring and did not like it, though. I think its easy for his style to turn into a cliche. Stick with the Tropics imo.

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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  Guest on Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:06 pm


    Hollywood - Charles Bukowski

    Only because I really want to have a career out there and it was cool reading about it from a legitimate writer's perspective.
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    DopeMasterJFlow
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  DopeMasterJFlow on Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:57 pm

    I second the Tropic of Cancer vote. A true classic.

    I would also add the Island by Aldous Huxley which maybe one of the best philosophical novels ever written.
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    K$tu

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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  K$tu on Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:53 pm

    I think that I will probably spend years re-reading "Infinite Jest." When I feel like I need to read (something great), starting with any of its pages is the best way to satisfy that hunger
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    Karl
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  Karl on Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:57 pm

    yeah, its one of those books i feel like i'm always carrying around in the pit of my stomach. i have so much love for it i can't even express it. at this stage in my life it is my favorite book ever.
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  Karl on Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:58 pm

    almost as much love for Supposedly Fun Thing, Oblivion, and Brief Inteviews, too
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    The Rebirth

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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  The Rebirth on Sat Aug 14, 2010 1:51 am

    I just read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo recently. It did not impact me profoundly.
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    DopeMasterJFlow
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  DopeMasterJFlow on Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:41 pm

    The Rebirth wrote:I just read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo recently. It did not impact me profoundly.

    There is a movie based on this book now, right?
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  The Rebirth on Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:50 pm

    I'm pretty sure they have three movies to match the three books put out by the Swedes. However,there is an American trilogy in the works!
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    KCLU
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  KCLU on Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:42 pm

    as discussed in the Chomsky/Israel thread: Understanding Power
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    Re: books that have had a huge impact on you

    Post  KCLU on Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:53 pm

    surprised it didn't come to mind immediately - The Denial of Death!

    from the wiki:
    The basic premise of The Denial of Death is that human civilization is ultimately an elaborate, symbolic defense mechanism against the knowledge of our mortality, which in turn acts as the emotional and intellectual response to our basic survival mechanism. Becker argues that a basic duality in human life exists between the physical world of objects and a symbolic world of human meaning. Thus, since man has a dualistic nature consisting of a physical self and a symbolic self, man is able to transcend the dilemma of mortality through heroism, a concept involving his symbolic half. By embarking on what Becker refers to as an "immortality project" (or causa sui), in which he creates or becomes part of something which he feels will last forever, man feels he has "become" heroic and, henceforth, part of something eternal; something that will never die, compared to his physical body that will die one day. This, in turn, gives man the feeling that his life has meaning; a purpose; significance in the grand scheme of things.

    From this premise, mental illness is most insightfully extrapolated as a bogging down in one's hero system(s). When someone is experiencing depression, their causa sui (or heroism project) is failing, and they are being consistently reminded of their mortality and insignificance as a result. Schizophrenia is a step further than depression in which one's causa sui is falling apart, making it impossible to engender sufficient defense mechanisms against their mortality; henceforth, the schizophrenic has to create their own reality or "world" in which they are better heroes. Becker argues that the conflict between immortality projects which contradict each other (particularly in religion) is the wellspring for the destruction and misery in our world caused by wars, bigotry, genocide, racism, nationalism, and so forth, since an immortality project which contradicts others indirectly suggests that the others are wrong.

    Another theme running throughout the book is that humanity's traditional "hero-systems" i.e. religion, are no longer convincing in the age of reason; science is attempting to solve the problem of man, something that Becker feels it can never do. The book states that we need new convincing "illusions" that enable us to feel heroic in the grand scheme of things, i.e. immortal. Becker, however, does not provide any definitive answer, mainly because he believes that there is no perfect solution. Instead, he hopes that gradual realization of man's innate motivations, namely death, can help to bring about a better world.
    I consider ^^^ every day.

    another one, should be obvious: Animal Liberation by Peter Singer.

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